Title tbc

Melchior Aelmans, Juniper Networks

Abstract to follow.

 

Title tbc

Siddarth Joshi

Abstract to follow.

Characterisation of Faint-Pulse-Sources for QKD

Peter J. Schlosser, Fraunhofer UK Research Ltd.

 Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) is the method of secure sharing of encryption keys between two end users by the application of quantum technology. Satellite based; free space quantum key distribution has the potential to provide the means of transmitting secure keys between end users across the globe and overcome limitations posed by fibre-optic based system designs. An important challenge in free space QKD is the availability of suitable transmitter devices with a low size, weight, power consumption and cost. In this work, we are looking at alternative light sources for the use in transmitter modules. Commercially available VCSEL devices are being investigated as directly modulated faint-pulse-sources to determine important parameters, such as spectral, polarisation, power, bandwidth and pulse-to-pulse performance, that are key for QKD applications.

 

An Integrated Fibre and Satellite QKD Network Optimisation

Vasileios Karavias,  University of Cambridge

Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) promises information theoretic security. Limitations on fibre based QKD mean long distance QKD necessary for global Quantum Networks is currently only possible using satellites. We construct Mixed Integer Linear Program models to investigate how to best connect the core fibre network to ground stations to minimise the overall network cost. We use the models designed to investigate how different allocation strategies to ground stations changes the number of satellites needed to satisfy transmission requirements showing that appropriate allocation strategies can yield a reduction of over 40% in the number of satellites. Furthermore, we use these models to investigate securing the Data Centre traffic in 2 networks, one European and one Global. We show that optimally configuring the core sites to ground stations can reduce the cost of the network by up to 40% compared to simply connecting the core sites to their geographically nearest ground station.

 

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